What size is the rumored iPhone 6? Get instant iPhone case with 3-D prints

By Dennis Clemente

Have you tried 3-D printing before? Makerbot is everywhere these days, in retail stores around the country, where you can see how they work and how it hopes it will speed up mainstream adoption. With the rumors of a new iPhone 6 swirling around (Apple released media invites for a September 9 event), Fraemes as its second printing enabled app could help produce those cases.

Last August 26, Brooklyn Tech Meetup hosted an event featuring Makerbot with Maureen Coiro and Ben McCallum talking about 3D printing and 3D scanning, respectively. Coiro showed a video of its type of users – engineers, designers, educators and students.

What is 3D printing and how did it come to be? For the uninitiated, it was used for prototyping. It’s still used in the regard but now it’s also used for function, fit, user testing design, validation, packaging and of course, for fun.

How does it work? At Makerbot, Coiro said, it’s as simple as setting up the replicator, sending file to printer, and start printing.

In terms of 3D scanning, McCallum explained its value proposition as follows:

• Reduction of the customer timeline: 8-man weeks to integrate customer timeline
• Cost savings of staffing years: No need to build an enterprise platform
• Platform as a service, minimal permanent staff
• Risk is reduced: To deploy a voice control
• Premium price now: Staying competitive long term

Radiolab used the Digitizer to help “tell the story of one little thing that has radically changed what we know about humanity’s humble beginnings and the kinds of creatures that were out to get us way back when.”

In the not so distance future, consider facial analysis, identification, security and contextual interfaces, even gaze tracking and emotion recognition.