German startups Keeeb, Night Advisor come to NY

By Dennis Clemente

German startups in New York to seek funding, gain more exposure and reach

NEW YORK–German startups Keeeb, Favendo and Night Adivsors took turns demonstrating their platforms at the German Accelerator NY last December 15 at Rise NY. 

Conrad Gulla of Keeeb got the most votes for his presentation of his platform. Touted as a personal Google for everyone, it helps you clip anything online, similar to how Evernote’s Skitch and other similar tools work but one that you can even put to good use on MS Word as well.

Gulla said the company has mostly relied on word of mouth to reach 75,000 beta users at the moment, some of them making productive use of their clips at $9 a month with large organizations paying higher for its additional services.

“We started with large organizations in mind. If we can get them into this product category, we (believe we can get the small companies),” he said.

Keeeb is hoping to get a slice of the e-commerce industry which raked in $87 billion dollars in the third quarter with 200,000 etailers enjoying that windfall. Amazon even managed to get 15% of the pie through its constant consumer innovation.

The German startup is seeking Series A funding within 3 to 6 months.

The panelists who took turns asking the presenters some questions were Jessica Peltz-Zatulove, principal of kbs+ ventures; Deepen Parikh, venture partner of Interplay Ventures and Mitchelle Kleinhandler, venture partner of  Scout Ventures.

Would you believe the GPS was invented in 1978? It certainly sparked a revolution in how people interact with the world around them. In the digital age, it has become more than just a navigation application. GPS is on Google Now, Google Maps, Foursquare, Uber and Waze.

With Favendo, David Keil said it has brought GPS indoors using beacons installed at retail stores, for instance. “Retail is just the beginning,” he said. It ultimately seeks to become the search for the physical store, even car finder.

“We are also working with hospitals now,” he said. Eventually, he wants to add airports, museums, train stations and office buildings.

The bulk of sales comes mostly from its software. Keil said Favendo has amassed $2.3 million in revenue  with 50 installations and 30,120 beacons deployed to date. The beacons cost $25 to $30 each. It charges a monthly service fee that depends on the size of the venue. Customers have to download the app.

How much do NYC venues need to earn per night? More than 250 customers but the money earned also goes to the average rental fee of $54,000 a month. That’s New York for you.

Last presenter, Johannes Herzer, CEO of Night Advisor, talked about how his company brings people to venues and how it addresses the limited time for online  marketing. Its Saas tool empowers venues and events to create and manage ad campaigns in minutes.

Since inception a year ago, it has raised $40K from angel investors, including club owners with an average revenue per customer of $165 month.

Cloud is at critical point but adoption faces cultural challenge

Cloud faces cultural challenge

“The cloud is at that critical point. We’re in for a major disruption.”

This was Michael Liebow of Accenture Cloud  speaking last December 11 at the NY Enterprise Tech meetup that included Randall Hunt of Amazon Lambda and Jonathan Fullam of Pivotal Cloud Foundry.

Liebow was talking about how many corporations can approach the cloud from the technical, commercial and cultural standpoint. Now, if only most of them can step out of their comfort zones and embrace it. If not, a disruption enabler is clearly needed–to bring some governance and make it easy to deploy services.

Liebow came with CTO Paul Daugherty, also of Accenture, to announce and demonstrate version 3 of Accenture Cloud at NYET’s meetup at Cooley LLP.

The Accenture Cloud Platform (ACP) is a self-service cloud management portal, hosted and managed by Accenture and offered “as a Service.” ACP manages the virtual infrastructure of its public and private clouds. “We sell it as a service, (but) it’s a product within Accenture,” Liebow said.

Cloud-based, scalable, pay-as-you-go consumption of IT infrastructure services is now essential to delivering the business capabilities required by a digital business.

ACP allows digital businesses to get fast access to pre-vetted, quality cloud services through an extensible service catalog for IT governance and self-service provisioning of cloud computing services.

“It’s fully customizable. Through encryption and our solutions, you can create a secure design,” Liebow said.

ACP supports leading providers such as Amazon, Microsoft, Cisco, NTT Communications and others.

The next presenter was Amazon Lambda, a compute service that runs your code in response to events and automatically manages the compute resources for you, making it easy to build applications that respond quickly to new information.

AWS Lambda starts running your code within milliseconds of an event such as an image upload, in-app activity, website click, or output from a connected device. You can also use AWS Lambda to create new back-end services where compute resources are automatically triggered based on custom requests. With AWS Lambda you pay only for the requests served and the compute time required to run your code.

With AWS Lambda you pay only for the requests served and the compute time required to run your code. Billing is reportedly metered in increments of 100 milliseconds, making it cost-effective and easy to scale automatically from a few requests per day to thousands per second.

Hunt called Amazon Lambda “a zero-administration computer platform, because your infrastructure should not interfere with your life.”

Last presenter was Fullam of Pivotal Cloud, a new platform that converges both application developer and IT operator processes so enterprises can quickly iterate on software while achieving built-in operator efficiencies.

Pivotal demonstrated how Cloud Foundry PaaS enables a developer to deploy an application in seconds and remove the complexities around application health management, updates, and scaling.