Dog Parker, State of Place lend new meaning to hyperlocal service

NEW YORK–Last November 9, Coinvent held a whole-day tech startup fair with several startups and inspirational talks at the Metropolitan Avenue in Chelsea.

http://pulse.coinvent.co/ny15

Dog Parker was one of the most popular startups as it showed a “doghouse” that provides secure dog parking when you’re out and about in the city with your dog and you need to run an errand. Dog Parker partners with businesses to place Dog Parkers in front their stores.  

Launched in Brooklyn in October 2015, the plan is to expand to the rest of New York and then to as many cities. This service will be offered to members only. Dog owners must sign up online at www.dogparker.com/membership to get an access card to use Dog Parker.

Annual memberships cost $25 per dog. Once approved, a membership card will be mailed to you and allow you to access the network of Dog Parkers. Membership works similarly to ZipCar and Car2Go if you have used those services before.

But how long can you park a dog? Dog Parkers have a maximum time limit of three hours per 12-hour time period. The price is $0.20 per minute ($12 an hour). Membership is an annual fee of $25.

Each Dog Parker is reportedly cleaned by a Dog Parker sanitation crew on a scheduled weekly basis and then as-needed if there are any specific issues. Sanitation wipes are available to users at each location to anyone who may want to use them in addition to its sanitation system.

Each Dog Parker aims to keep the temperature inside comfortable for the dog in both the summer and winter. In the summer it plans to have solar-powered fans for air circulation.  On extreme temperature days where the temperature inside the Dog Parker goes below 32 degrees Fahrenheit or above 85 degrees, it will not be available for use.

Complementing Dog Parker’s business model somehow is State of Place. Founder Mariela Alfonso said it aims to harness the power of predictive urban data analytics to not only enhance the public good, but also to maximize economic development and engage the community.

State of Place quantifies walkability of existing neighborhoods; identifies built environment assets and needs; prioritize built environment changes with maximum impact on walkability and economic development; forecast the walkability impact of planning scenarios & development proposals; objectively compare planning scenarios & development proposals based on their walkability potential and measure the walkability impact of planning, urban design, and development projects post-implementation.

The benefits is predicted to help provide data–driven evidence of walkable development opportunities; economically justify urban design “asks” of developers; maximize resource allocation and get the biggest bang for your walkability buck; establish an evidence-based RFP process; foster community engagement; turn your planning team into walkability experts and tap into State of Place’s walkability thought-leadership.

State of Place also allows developers, investors, and brokers to leverage the pent-up demand for walkable places while also facilitating stakeholder buy-in by quantifying how delivering walkability is more than just a social good.

For communities, it offers a comprehensive diagnosis of their built environment assets and needs that can be benchmarked against other communities. It serves as an advocacy tool to more effectively justify changes to existing policies, garner developer support, and target key design interventions.

In the talk-workshop portion of the event, Coinvent delved on several diverse subjects ranging from building a world-class startup and the future of phone services to selling your company and hyperlocal marketing.

Among 60 startups in expo, Hotels By Day lets you find last-minute deals

NEW YORK–Last November 3, Alley Boost held a half-day startup expo featuring more than 60 startups at La Venue on 12th Avenue, blocks away from the Javits Convention Center.

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/alley-boost-startup-expo-tickets-17364991156

Many of the startups came from AlleyBoost’s meetups like Hotels By Day; it’s for those looking to find rooms on the same day. It’s definitely for travelers who need to find rooms last minute. Hotels By Day was the favorite in a show-and-tell demo some months back.

With the sharing economy gaining favor, Triggr is looking at having its laundry and dry-cleaning pick-up service a hit among New Yorkers.

Tommy Tranfaglia of Dream It Reel offers video editing services with huge discounts for early registrants to his site.

Justworks was also at the expo but since it mainly handles human resources and payroll matters in the US, Global Tax a few tables down helps assist foreign startups. For legal advice, Moisan Legal P.C. utilizes technology to foster a collaborative client/attorney interaction. It aims at providing an ongoing strategic resource to enable businesses to operate effectively.

Zuznow is dedicated to providing a sophisticated platform for automatically converting any web application, no matter how complex the design of functionality. CEO Chen Levkovich was at the expo.

How would you like to give your phone’s lock a makeover? With Go Locker, you can convert it to look like cubed tiles or animated characters.

Jessica Tang of Smart Vision Labs was giving away forms for people to have their eyes tested for free. “We can come to your office to offer an eye exam to your employees,” she said.

Majestyk, which wowed us months ago with its successful Kickstarter-funded Cognitoys, was at the expo to promote something different–its app development service with its heavy concentration on branding. It prides itself in creating a seamless user experience for any brands that need to make its apps work across different platforms. Gonzo Estupinan said he is also in the business of web and app development.

Sports Wonks is a sports social network that gives fans and athletes a platform to share their thoughts, get the latest news and highlights, and more.

Not all startups had sites or apps to promote. Meraj Mohammad said he offers insights on “testosterone living,” as he eventually hopes to provide an online resource for those interested in the subject.

AlleyBoost’s expo was meant for startups to find business opportunities, generate leads, connect with investors and find talent. For attendees, it was a chance to see early startups which, in turn, also become opportunities for job-seekers, the media and investors to network and stumble upon some diamonds in the rough.

Pager is Tinder for doctors

By Dennis Clemente

NEW YORK–“It’s Tinder for doctors,” says Toby Hervey about his on-demand house-call doctors app. He was one of the presenters that included Ulula, Kiddo App and Domain Skate last October 20 at the NY Tech Breakfast at Microsoft.

http://www.meetup.com/NYC-TechBreakfast/events/218601135/

In most demonstrations in tech meetups, you’ll see the presenter themselves trying on the product while the audience watch how his app or site works.

What was different in Hervey’s presentation was how he had another miked-up person interact with the app as if he’s the user and he’s experiencing the app on the spot. That’s what Pager did in its presentation–and it helped the app make its point clearly. It’s an app that can get you a house-call doctor.

Currently only offered in New York’s boroughs and some areas in San Francisco, Pager is currently an out-of-pocket service but there is reportedly a reimbursement option. It is highly recommended that you clarify later with Pager if there are changes in its policy.  Also, note if prescription orders are delivered within an hour as advertised.

“The cost structure is transparent. It’s $200 now but it’s not that expensive. It will cost you $135 when you go to a doctor now. Costs pile up (when you see a doctor),” he said.

Doctors, most of them general practitioners, are recruited and asked to be listed in the app.

Kiddo App presented next. It’s a family calendar app designed to make it simple to manage everyday family life.  

“We don’t plan to monetize data,” said Tzvia Bader in response to question about privacy for their children. She came up with the app to address a market size of $140 million for parents. It’s available on Android and iOS.

Presenting last, Howard Greenstein showed DomainSkate, an intellectual property and brand security protection for business.

He addressed the current security threats online and how rampant identity theft is, pointing out one instance where a site mimicked Bloomberg and stole $275 million worth of information. With DomainSkate, he said you can “manage and mitigate your problem with malware.”   

Although in the list, Ulula was not able to present.

The event was sponsored by DLA Piper (NYC),  DonQuiSoft, Fairfax County EDA, FiverrGrassi & Co., KISSPatent, Nexus Staff, Rainbow Broadband and SimilarWeb.

20 Korean startups land in NY

NEW YORK–The second Korean Summit NYC last October 16 at the New Yorker Wyndham featured several Korean startups with Charlie Kim, founder and CEO of Next Jump, and Murat Aktihanoglu, managing director of Entrepreneurs Roundtable Accelerator, as main speakers.

https://koreanstartupsummitnyc.splashthat.com/

It’s not everyday you see different cultures and countries working together but ERA’s Aktihanoglu, a Turkish immigrant to the US since 1998, spoke about his trip to Korea and how it proved to be a valuable experience for everyone–startups in Korea and those from New York, and how it all resulted in a Korean startup summit. It’s something almost unheard of in Silicon Alley.

Kim, a Korean American, extolled an Asian virtue of building a company that “can make your father and mother proud.” His speech was tempered and more realistic, as he took the audience on a journey of his success in business, stressing how entitlement will get you nowhere.

Among the startup presenters in the whole-day affair were PinStory, the go-to resource for foodies in Korea; Anyractive with GoTouch and how it turns any display screen such as TV, monitor and projector into a touchscreen; Who’s Good which provides dynamic data on environmental, social and governance risks.

Huinno builds innovative, clinically-tested wearable capable of measuring vital signs, including blood pressure; Ediket which provides a unique proofreading service by integrating full proofreading experiences with its web technology.

Moloco saves Silicon Valley’s mobile apps by resolving the key restriction of the current page view-driven mobile ads, while ZIKTO gently vibrates on your wrist when it detects bad walking posture. There more presenters and and more than 20 other startups at the exhibit hall.

How are these startups doing and how did they get their start. Slidejoy has reportedly been downloaded 500,000 times with clients ranging from startups to FORTUNE 200 companies. Pinstory reportedly came to fruition when Yelp ignored the request of its founder to come to Asia. It’s customized search result via machine learning with 1,000 business accounts.

GoTouch looked mighty impressive and was a huge favorite as it also works to bundle itself with Samsung and SK Telecom.

Who’s Good was received warmly for its more social bent in investing while also providing visualization and analysis that draw inspiration from financial investing.

Huinno’s focus on healthcare wearables allow you measure your vitals, including your blood pressure as its addresses the world’s global hypertension rate at 40 percent. It is reportedly 99 percent accurate, as determined in a clinical test.

Among the Korean VC panelists were Richard Jun, managing partner at Bam Ventures; David Lee, investor and former director, Google Asia Pacific; Hyuk Jeen Suh, head of Samsung Ventures East Coast and John Ryu, partner at Scout Ventures.

The event was hosted by KOTRA with Joseph Juhn, KSE, World-Okta NY and GORI.

New York Tech Meetup launches deep dive event series featuring Addicaid and Pager

NEW YORK–Last October 14, the New York Tech Meetup brought back two of its most popular demos – Addicaid and Pager — to mark the launch of its new “Demo Deep Dive” event series in lower Manhattan.

http://www.meetup.com/ny-tech/events/225728792/

Sam Frons, founder and CEO of Addicaid, presented first followed by Toby Hervey, general manager of Pager, both platforms with an app that allows people to reach out for help. Addicaid is an addiction recovery platform, while Pager is on-demand service for people seeking house calls from doctors.

Frons started her talk by talking about the 2 million documented cases of substance abuse in the United States. With Addicaid, she is addressing how most people can recover from what could be the most effective methods–individual coaching, action-oriented goals, personal incentives and self-help groups.

With Addicaid, she is looking forward to ensuring long-term patient engagement, providing effective and affordable care. Through technology, she collects metrics –active and passive data – and other variables that come into play like sentiment analysis and behavior, among other things Her app has been downloaded 20,000 times. Addicaid now has curated news.

In a few months, it will launch nearby meeting notifications, daily goal reminders, SOS alerts and even coaches, with option to choose one-on-one coaching, as well as tailored treatment plans. “We are lowering the barrier to entry and reducing stigma,” she said.

Hervey presented Pager, a mobile app and service providing high-quality healthcare on demand through doctor house calls. It’s a mobile, location-based service in the sense that you can be customers at your office or in your home with no time to see a doctor during the day.

Hervey said the growing friction in assessing care and overuse of emergency rooms prompted the company to start Pager, which is striving for a seamless patient experience. It looks forward to reducing costs for payers in the long run, partly also because of its partnership with a drug company. Yes, it looks forward to having prescriptions delivered to patients.

“No other setting or service brings Pager’s level of convenience to the care experience,” he claimed. It also has a rating system. In November, it aims to launch its chat feature.

Most of the doctors are family physicians and serve the New York area.

It’s interesting how house calls, which accounted for 40 percent of the medical practice back in the 1930s, is back because of technology.

Online insurance, waiter app, design app at NY Tech Breakfast

NEW YORK–When every tech meetup seems to be covered at night, count NY Tech Breakfast counts on the early risers to come to its monthly event, now held at Microsoft for the second month. Last September 8, NY Tech Breakfast featured PolicyGenius, Proscape, TableSwipes and LawGo.

http://www.meetup.com/NYC-TechBreakfast/events/218601126/

How about getting most of your insurance needs online? PolicyGenius’ CTO, Ian Yamey, talked about how the startup guides people to apply for insurance every step of the way, with a coverage calculator to help anyone make informed decisions.

He gave a walk-through of the application online, showing us how it’s easy to just fill in information to get different types of insurance online. “It’s an insurance checkup that takes 10 minutes to do,” he said, adding how it’s important for them to educate consumers about insurance as well.

If you’re shopping for the right company, Yamey guarantees unbiased quote comparisons as it hopes to cater directly to consumers, skipping agents altogether. Other insurance it offers includes pet and renters.

What makes them different? Insurance companies capture your information and sell to multiple insurance brokers/agents, while PolicyGenius claims it’ll work with you personally.

Also, it claims it’s easier to comparison and understand insurance the way it has focused on delivering a great experience.

Proscape helps ad agencies use the marketing app cloud to build and deliver apps–without coding. It makes sense for ad agencies that have to meet insane deadlines from clients everyday.

It’s supposed to reduce your app production times to hours, not months; eliminate the complexity and pain associated with custom app development; build powerful apps that integrate with CRM systems that generate insightful reporting; and give you the creative freedom you need to design in your tool of choice.

Proscape has a different pricing model, even for stores and sales and device, but there is a pricing model for the rest of us at $25 a month.

Since this is clearly targeted for ad agencies, its audience should at least know how to use Adobe Photoshop

Next presenter Prem Babu of TableSwipes said nobody has bridged the gap between owner and waiter with customers. What he means is the wait customers have to endure to be served their food–the wait to get seated, the wait to place orders, the wait for food and finally, the wait again to pay.

His app may just help waiters manage their time more efficiently in between tables and the kitchen. His solution, TableSwipes, will allow Waiters to use their iPhones to take orders at the table. Its app is customer designed and equipped with powerful features to help streamline order-taking. Its payment gateway is Stripe.

Orders can be instantly related to the kitchen on top of giving customers the necessary friendly alerts to help waiters better improve their dining experience.

Another presenter was LawGo. You choose a legal service, purchase the service you need in 5 minutes and get started with your lawyer. What many will like about the service is how you can choose a fixed-price legal service.

Digital clinic app Maven Clinic on the spot; JustWorks launches new permissions level

NEW YORK– The product challenges at the Product Council last August 31 were the digital clinic app offered by Maven Clinic and the new permissions level to be offered by JustWorks starting September 1. The meetup was held at the Pivotal Labs.

http://www.meetup.com/Product-Council-NYC/events/223398101/

Maven Clinic’s Suzy Grange presented her app as a way to connect women with vetted healthcare experts via video complete with a forum for female patients and medical practitioners to talk to each other. It’s her answer to Googling your symptoms well and the endless wait in clinics.

The app works this way: You choose a practitioner, book an appointment and follow up. Pricing is $15 per session.

Why women? Women, said Grange, make 80 percent of healthcare decisions in their families. Women interact with the healthcare system at so many different points in life. And 80 percent of healthcare practitioners are women.

Launched last April 2015, the app is available nationwide with prescriptions offered in 5 states. It runs on iOs only right now.

What are the barriers to usage? Grange pointed out education, trust and immediacy. Just getting message across platforms can be a challenge along with immediacy, which may be reactive and requires developing a relationship with a practitioner.

Also present to give their inputs were Camilla Velasquez, Head of Product at Justworks, Jung Sin, a Product Design and UX Consultant and Jen Ator, Fitness Director at Women’s Health Magazine. –

If things don’t work out on video, Velasquez pointed out how it might be good if the company could help her schedule and meet her doctor in person. Safety was also raised. But overall, the response, even from the audience, was positive, saying it could make people more pro-active about their health.

To make the app sticky, another panelist suggested big-name practitioners to anchor the site. Others said determining her market is also crucial. She may also need to look into how coaching sites work, so people will keep coming back to the site. This is because if they only go when they’re ill, that’s a one-time incident. Offering something free for a period of time was also suggested.

As far as understanding her audience, it’s also important not to assume a lot of people know about what ails them or what they need to be tested for. College-age students may not know a lot of things about their health, for instance. It would have been better if the meetup had a doctor already signed up to the system as guest to give us an idea what she thinks about it and how she will be compensated.

Another panelist stressed again out how the app is “breaking a culture,” which means changing women’s behavior, young or old, into becoming more pro-active about their health.

The next speaker of the night was Velasquez of JustWorks, also one of the panelists, who talked about the launch of the site’s new permission system. Justworks is a platform that automates HR, payments, benefits and government paperwork for SMBs. There are 28M small businesses in the US.

Camilla Velasquez, head of Product at Justworks, pointed out the four product principles to explain Justworks’ new permission system: simple, fast, guiding and scales.

She said Justworks is solving the problem but sticking to their principles. Simple and fast: Small number of easy to understand permissions; too early for groups; Guiding: instruct users which permissions are for which roles; require admin status before adding permission; Scales: one overview screen, two entry points; flexible framework.

For direct reporting, she cited the changes in the following manner. Simple, fast: Turn on/off. Limit groups until later, with option to take action via email; Guiding defaults: Clear communications. Roll up and transparency for senior levels; Scales: Lay foundation for groups as new features are rolled out.

Apps need to get sticky in 3 months

There are two ways to go about acquiring customers with apps—organic and paid. In Yahoo’s recent app smart phone research conducted in July 2015, with a sample test of 2,590 people, the results varied.

Organic search users most actively searched for new apps in the following categories: gaming, 88 percent and video, 80 percent. About 60 percent claimed suggestions (from users) triggered a download.

In terms of downloads, people decided based on direct control: price, description, photo, video and release notes. Indirectly, they were compelled to do so by the ratings, reviews and smart prompts.

In terms of behavior, the app downloads were triggered by how people like to look for something cool/hottest; it was a personal recommendation, and they just got bored with their apps.

It was interesting to find out that parents downloaded an app based on the request of their kids.

The preferred categories were entertainment, connection and shopping.

As for paid acquisitions, the mobile app installs in 2014 netted $3.6 billion, 50 percent of them based on their response to an advertisement. Brand messaging is alive and well in the app space, as 50 percent of users also claim previous brand knowledge as a result of other marketing channels.

The top categories influenced by ads were entertainment, shopping, sports and games. What made the ads effective: a clear CTA, app store rating and a “rich’ image. Yahoo extolled the importance of “creativity that connects.”

What gets unreported is how people remove apps for various reasons. About 60 percent “clean their apps” 18 times a year. To find out how your app gets waylaid? It’s when the app is dormant for 12 weeks.

The most revealing and may be not as surprising reason for removing an app? About 73 percent delete their apps because of battery concerns. Users also say they remove apps to declutter and free up storage space.

There are two ways to go about acquiring customers with apps—organic and paid. In Yahoo’s recent app smart phone research conducted in July 2015, with a sample test of 2,590 people, the results varied.

Organic search users most actively searched for new apps in the following categories: gaming, 88 percent and video, 80 percent. About 60 percent claimed suggestions (from users) triggered a download.

In terms of downloads, people decided based on direct control: price, description, photo, video and release notes. Indirectly, they were compelled to do so by the ratings, reviews and smart prompts.

In terms of behavior, the app downloads were triggered by how people like to look for something cool/hottest; it was a personal recommendation, and they just got bored with their apps.

It was interesting to find out that parents downloaded an app based on the request of their kids.

The preferred categories were entertainment, connection and shopping.

As for paid acquisitions, the mobile app installs in 2014 netted $3.6 billion, 50 percent of them based on their response to an advertisement. Brand messaging is alive and well in the app space, as 50 percent of users also claim previous brand knowledge as a result of other marketing channels.

The top categories influenced by ads were entertainment, shopping, sports and games. What made the ads effective: a clear CTA, app store rating and a “rich’ image. Yahoo extolled the importance of “creativity that connects.”

What gets unreported is how people remove apps for various reasons. About 60 percent “clean their apps” 18 times a year. To find out how your app gets waylaid? It’s when the app is dormant for 12 weeks.

The most revealing and may be not as surprising reason for removing an app? About 73 percent delete their apps because of battery concerns. Users also say they remove apps to declutter and free up storage space.

Button is building deep linking to open the walled garden called apps

NEW YORK–Last March 23, the On-Demand Economy meetup featured Button, Managed by Q and Minibar at the Animoto offices in midtown Manhattan.

http://www.meetup.com/Product-Hunt-NYC/events/221089761/

Much of the tech world is trying to figure out deep linking, that is, making the mobile app ecosystem work more like the web.

Button is building deep linking. “When you go to site it’s hard to open links and open it because of the walled garden in apps,” Mike Dudas of Button said. “Deep linking will become a utility.”

Founded only last year, Button is accelerating its product after receiving a $12-million series A investment. Button is an official development partner of Uber.

Managed by Q provides office cleaning and other smart services to help your office operations run smoothly—all managed via an iPad that’s installed for free in your office.

Managed by Q shared 10 key principles on how it runs its product which are essential for any startup.

1. Obsess over structure because structure defines outcomes

2. Organize by audience, not business departments. Instead of structuring it by department, cleaning departments, we organize by the audience it serves

3. Build teams around problems — not products

4. Match-make designer and engineer pairs and prototype things quickly

5. Formalize your process of meeting your users

6. Only hire designers with s trifecta of skills. You need to understand user and product problems; wireframe and design pretty pixels and vectors; have coding experience

7. Beware of product snacking—low effort and high impact

8. Own your code; no one to review code

9. Deploy multiple times a day. Small increments to build into a crescendo, keeping things agile

10. Connect the dots. Talk to product teams and others

And that name Q? It’s from the James Bond movie.

Started last year and now in 8 cities, Minibar provides on-demand delivery of wines, spirits, beers and mixers.

“We connect local liquor stores to offer the best selection of products,” CTO Chris Kohonen said. They (stores) are connected to our payment gateway.”

Still in its growing stage, Minibar faces the fact that it needs convince the liquor store, refine their technology and ultimately face regulatory concerns but Kohonen sounds like he has the cojones to tackle these challenges with his team.

Minibar is reportedly in New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Chicago, Washington, DC, Miami and Dallas.

Tiggly, Dweet.io among standouts at NY Tech Meetup demo night

nytechmeetup114

By Dennis Clemente

How do you pack in 12 startup demos in two hours? Last November 3, the NY Tech Meetup did it again with Tiggly and Dweet.io among the standouts of the night at Skirball Theater at NYU.

Every parent sees their kids using digital devices more, which also means less physical playtime for them. Recently funded for $4 million, Tiggly has found a way to merge both physical play with the digital world in its tablet app. It has developed game apps and physical objects used in tandem with tablets to help educate kids using conductor silicon. The startup has clearly found a sweet spot between a toy and an app.

CEO Peter Semmelhack presented dweet.io, a Twitter for things. You dweet, say, a public swimming pool temperature or air quality in a city. It’s Twitter for machines, sensors, devices, robots and gadgets, enabling data to become easily accessible through a web-based RESTful API.

Built from day one for commercial and enterprise deployments, a dweet payload can reach up to 2,000 characters. It’s public by default but you can make dweets private by purchasing a lock which are then applied to thing names. Each locks costs $0.99.

It only holds a thing’s last 500 dweets for up to 24 hours, then it’s history. But you can build a connector to your data store of choice such as Dropbox, AWS and Tempo-DB.

Next presenter, Admitted.ly positioned itself like how online dating works. It is a free platform that helps high school students find their dream colleges and universities, connect with mentors, and get accepted.

A “graduate” of ER Accelerator, Admitted.ly works as an outreach for high school students and guidance counselors but in a fun, engaging way. It even has walkability directions among other useful guides when choosing a school.

Another presenter, BugLabs, is a software company that focuses on providing easy enterprise application development tools for the Internet of Things.

Keezy’s presentation was perhaps the first unspoken one in NY Tech Meetup’s decade-long history. The demo showed how the music software works using two if its music apps, Keezy and Keezy Drummer for iOS, easily that even kids can play around with them. You can record different sounds on Keezy but the Drummer is just one kit.

Not all presentations are crowd-pleasing but some marketing people listened intently on how Offerpop works to create marketing engagement platforms for today’s social and mobile consumers—and how it helps the best brands, retailers and agencies in the world connect, engage and convert consumers.

Launched last September 29, Parcel offers off-hours delivery service in New York (not including Queens) for only $5 (not heavier than 30 pounds, no higher or longer than 2 feet). You can select a one-hour delivery window.
Other presenters include Simple Machine, crafter of gaming experiences and stories like The Outcast as well as SquareSpace which now integrates Getty Images in its CMS platform for people to buy photos to use directly on their sites.

Waywire Networks talked about how its curating all the videos to make it easy for everyone to find the videos based on their interests. Each channel is authored and “highly niched.” It hosts content and is currently looking for curators
The Hacks of the Month were Calcash, an 8-bit online arithmetic battle game that makes learning and solving problems fun, accessible, and competitive; NewsFeel, which graphs the New York Times articles on any topic based on sentiment and lastly, Nodeflow, a just-in-time synchronous Javascript compiler that makes Node.js development easier.